All posts in Meditation article

Why worry?

why worry

On worries and negative thoughts

By Petter Halvorsen

When we meditate, we sometimes drift into worry and ruminations. The stream of thoughts can bring about various inner dialogues. At times we get into negative evaluations about how we meditate: “Am I doing it right now? Is this a free mental attitude? Am I repeating the meditation sound properly?” There is often a critical inner voice that speaks to us and governs our inner action during meditation. Read more…

The art of small adjustments

By Ellen Gravklev

office workersIt’s a busy evening like many others. There are e-mails to answer, bills to be paid, work-related tasks you should complete. You start out optimistically, get some stuff done, check your Facebook account, and move on. Read more…

Slimming with yoga?

Studies indicate health gains from mind-body techniques

By Erik Ekker Solberg, PhD, cardiologist, specialist in sports medicine

yoga vajraAccording to recent studies, yoga and meditation practices may help us to lose weight, reduce our blood pressure, lower cholesterol levels, and slow down our pulse. Both psychological and physical quality of life seems to improve. Read more…

Verbal and non-verbal processing of psychological residues

By Thor Udenæs

We cannot control what comes to us spontaneously during meditation. Our focus is the volitional activity, the meditation practice itself. When we practice with a free mental attitude, we create a sort of mental freedom within us, where impressions, feelings, and fantasies can flow freely. Read more…

Free mental attitude in body and mind

by Torbjørn Hobbel

Tongtos yogaA free mental attitude – repeating the meditation sound gently and effortlessly in the mind and letting the stream of spontaneous thoughts come and go – is the basic principle of Acem Meditation. This attitude is essential to meditation. What about yoga? What is a free, open attitude on a bodily level? Read more…

Emotional processing increases when the mind is allowed to wander

– recent brain research attracts worldwide attention

The brain shows more signs of relaxation during meditation than during ordinary rest. Nondirective meditation has a greater impact than does concentrative meditation, especially in parts of the cortex associated with the processing of stress, emotions, and memories.

brain in nondirective meditation Read more…

Groundbreaking research on meditation and the brain

Nondirective meditation activates the brain’s resting network, allowing processing of thoughts, memories, and emotions

brain scanning of meditation
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Flow and friction in dance and meditation

Rolf Brandrud, Acem Meditation initiatorRolf Brandrud

In meditation, as in dance, we can be in a free flow, allowing our impulses to be expressed lightly and freely. But the more the free flow is allowed expression, the more clearly we notice the friction that makes it challenging for us. More training and practice may then help us get past the obstacles. Besides, to reflect over, share, and exchange our experiences of obstacles may give us the necessary motivation to go on when we encounter friction.
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A movie screen for our experiences

Margareta Hammarlund-Udenaes
PhD, Professor, Acem Initiator

In what climate do you meditate? Is it easy to repeat your meditation sound and to let spontaneous thoughts come and go? When is it more difficult? When there are many thoughts, or no recognized thoughts, or when you have a tendency to fall asleep? Or perhaps when thoughts about certain situations come to mind?

1331710_10954270 Read more…

World Champion in Acem Meditation

Christopher Grøndahl

meditation championBy following the instructions in this article, you will be able to meditate on an international top level. Read more…